Should you ever criticize the portfolio of another?

Criticizing Domain Investors
A bit of conversation today about critiquing another domain owners portfolio.
MapleDots started a post on Namepros giving a tip of the cap to Morgan Linton on his apology post to a .cx registrant.
Well I have looked at this from many angles for many years. Back when I started the .tv subforum when Namepros was not what it is today, when there was no such thing as a sub forum that focused on one extension, there would be some people who had differing opinions and then some people who just came to troll.
Now the community did not tolerate fools and it was dealt with every step of the way.
On the flipside, I never hyped or told one single person to ever register a .tv name. I don’t know your finances, business acumen, linguistics skills, risk tolerance, and last but not least, usually overlooked, your patience level. Many men and women can’t or don’t want to wait 3, 5, 10 years for a vision to come together.
I would always say, “why people who have no vested interest in another person’s money, try to tell them how to spend it, is funny.”
Now there are different discussion parameters, if you are investing and hyping you are going to get called out, doesn’t matter what anyone believes should be a professional decorum. If you are out regging .PW names for example and you are professing how great they are and how smart you are buying names in an extension with 18 recorded sales, there is going to be words of criticism coming in your direction.
If you just own them because you like them and believe they will sell, that’s a different story, no one should be talking smack to you.
I have always believed it depends if someone is asking for an opinion or hyping, well then there will be some words back.
Domaining doesn’t have a qualifying set of professional standards, if I was a Nascar driver, at a minimum I would know everyone on the racetrack with me in the upcoming event, knows how to drive, they might be better or worse as a driver but at least I know they can drive. In domaining everyone does not know how to drive. You need some currency and you can register a domain and BOOM you are a domainer, at least in your own eyes.
The other thing about domaining is it’s still a very solitary, sometimes lonely business and that also means you don’t know what someone else knows. They might have a deeper knowledge or even better a deeper reach in an industry where they have access to people who will listen to their pitch and might buy a name that if I owned, I would have no chance of getting heard.
The way I thought new gtlds could have any success was to pick an area or industry where you have above average knowledge or contacts, try to educate and actively sell to your network or industry.
There are some domainers that have great success selling Geo related names  and real estate based names because they were in those fields or locations. They had a leg up on other domain investors who did not come from real estate or have a family of realtors.
Many people in this world have interesting stories but if you have contacts in Hollywood, there is a greater chance of your story getting made into a movie, at the very least you will get a meeting to pitch your screenplay more often than someone with no ties but feels they have a knack for storytelling.
Domaining sometimes reminds me of Poker, where someone who is deemed a “fish” gets berated at a table when they suck out on someone. The person who believes they are a pro keeps berating the person until they leave. Others at the table get pissed not at the “fish” but at the loudmouth who chased the fish away. They have the belief the fish will eventually call off all their money, they don’t want them leaving the table.
Domain investors should be glad there are people doing things they would never invest in. It means less competition in whatever your strategy happens to be. If you have say 1000 people for hypothetical purposes, investing in alt extensions and you convince them they are fools, that only privately owned .coms and expiring auctions are the one true way, well now you just created 1000 new competitors for yourself. Why would you want that?
Commentary is important when someone is hyping and possibly misleading or rigging a market, where other new investors could be misled or scammed, then people should stand up and say something, point out the facts and let people decide for themselves before they follow the pied piper of alternative domain names.
Another component is that many don’t want your advice, they want you to validate their choices and if you don’t you are just a hater. So a lot of times the juice is not worth the squeeze and people need to find their own way in domaining. Those who want advice and are willing to learn will usually do better.

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How much do you care about masked whois and has it affected your sales?

Masked Whois

So Rob Monster started a thread about who should control a registrant’s whois? The thread also delves into how obscured whois affects domain sales.

Rob posted:

Do professional domain investors accept these extra steps and tolerate the idea that their WHOIS data is masked or otherwise obscured, effectively forcing people to contact registrants through other means?

At the same time, ad blocking software have made many conventional parking landers effectively blank screens. Some parking companies have started to pivot using landers but most parking is still an easy ad block.

I ask this because I realize that many domain sellers have had a tough few months with selling domains. It dawned on me that the drop in domain selling activity appeared to coincide with GDPR rollout which kicked off in earnest on May 25, 2018 and where many registrars simply masked everything on WHOIS.

One thing I noticed is people are all over the map in how they value public whois with relation to domain sales.

Jurgen Wolf said

As for me, the direct inquiries to my WHOIS email were very rare even prior GDPR.
99.99% – spam only.

So it is not important for me in terms of sales.

While Korganian was doing a lot better in the days of fully public whois.

Before GDPR, I had a lot more people email me or call me on the phone to purchase my domains.

I loved those quick phone sales out of the blue!!!

All the sales were to end users for a nice profit too.

Now Rob included a poll with regards to who should control whois on a domain name.

Who should decide whether WHOIS is visible?

No surprise that the registrant being in control is the leading vote getter at 85%.

Read the thread here

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Sedo adds 12 new sales landers

Sedo continues to add to it’s new sales landers with the addition of 12 more templates.

An email was sent out today announcing the new releases.

Now the new landing pages consist of 3 basic templates, which you can customize with information in 4 different ways:

  • Offer Box Only
  • Domain Facts
  • About the seller.
  • Full version

Sedo sales landers

One does wonder if Sedo waited too long to roll out what many were asking for years ago. Efty, DAN and Epik have set the standard for landing pages at the present time.

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Can aftermarkets prevent front running?

Front Running Domain Auctions

So I was reading a post on Namepros that was dealing with front running domain auctions.

The op actually had a front runner contact them on a domain they owned in another extension.

They actually posted the back and forth, which you can read here.

After that the conversation became about how NameJet should stop this and how they don’t really care about it in the opinion of some.

Another member Grego85 posted,

Why would they? Seriously.. think about it.

I replied with this,

Forget about why would they? How could they? I am not cheerleading for NameJet and I think there are things they can do better. I have never engaged in front running, but how could NameJet stop it.

So Goodtreats.com is expired on NameJet (hypothetical example), a human being decides to hit Google, corp directories, etc… Starts asking them if they would be interested in purchasing the name? How can NameJet prevent that? What legal standing would NameJet have if they knew about it? which in cases where the front runner doesn’t also email domain investors like in the coinsociety case would be less than 1% in my estimation.

Do we all know right now who is contacting businesses that have no understanding of NameJet/GoDaddy auctions? Plenty of people are probably out there sending off emails trying to get a bid.

I think aftermarkets have a lot of things they need to fix, but I cannot see how they can prevent front running, because if it was done right, where the spam monkey knew to avoid contacting domain investors, the aftermarket and domainers would never know what was going on in the first place.

Some have a position front running is not wrong and don’t see the problem.

 

What is your take on Front Running?

Perfectly legit
It’s wrong

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Sales and Trends report for August 2019

Sales and Trends

Looking back at August here we will examine sales data trends for certain naming categories.

August was a down month as expected, people are away on vacation and not as much business gets done. Sales were down roughly $1.6 million vs July.

Overall Namebio recorded 9,838 sales down from 10,400 total sales ($100 or more) in July. This was for a total dollar amount of $8.8million down from $10.4 million in July. The average sales price was $929 down from $998 in July. JoyRide.com was the high sale at $300,000.

There were 4 sales that reached 6 figures

Short names

Three letter .coms saw 5 sales in August (5 in July)

Four letter .coms recorded 321 sales down from 332 sales in July. 4L.com sales brought in $450,700 down from $788,600 in July. Of those 321 sales, 42 were Chips, (no a,e,i,o,u,v). Those chips brought in $34,100 in sales. Skew.com was the highest 4L.com sale at $92,000.

Popular four letter combo CVCV recorded 6 sales for $128,500.

Numerics there were no 2N,3N or 4N.com sales in August.

There were 516 5N.com sales in August up from 503 in July, these sales generated $402,800 in sales. The average sale price was $781 down from $828 in July. 66776.com was the high sale at $9,701.

6N.com sales totaled 144 (up from 131 in July) for $51,100. 698777.com was the high sale at $3,026.

Popular Keywords

There are certain keywords that are the most sought after in domain wanted threads, certain keywords that are the strongest when it comes to overall registration numbers.

Media recorded 11 sales ending in media, AudioMedia.com was the high sale at $5,450. The average sale was $1,549 up from $611 in July.

Labs recorded 11 sales ending in labs with SpinLabs.com being the high sale at $5,000. The average sales price was $1,327 up from $928 in July.

Online recorded 28 sales ending in online with 911online.com being the high sale at $2,450. The average sales price was $335 down $10 from July.

Coin recorded 22 sales ending in coin (6 were bitcoin, I thought that important to note) with Owncoin.com being the high sale at $2,050. The average sales price was $354 up from $288 in July. Coin also recorded 9 sales as the first keyword in a two word combo. CoinGuys.com was the high sale at $1,300. The average sales price was $545 down from $1,031 in July.

CBD recorded 8 sales starting with CBD with cbdcannabisoils.com being the high sale at $3,050. The average sales price was $1,049 up from $1,023 in July. CBD recorded 14 sales ending in CBD with LifestyleCBD.com being the high sale at $3,533. The average sales price was $530 up from $264 in June.

Crypto recorded 27 sales starting with Crypto (down from 39 in July) with CryptoCPA.com being the high sale at $12,000. The average sales price was $873 up from $320 in July. There were 3 sales with crypto as the second keyword, with DailyCrypto.com being the high sale at $2,550. Average sales price was $1,020 up from $596 in July.

Capital recorded 11 sales ending in Capital with EurekaCapital.com being the high sale at $1,525. Average sales price was $436 down from $441 in July.

Smart recorded 18 sales starting with Smart. SmartRealtor.com was the high sale at $1,006.

New GTLD’s

The new gtld’s generated 49 sales down from 54 sales in July. Total sales came in at $138,600 down just $200 from July. The high sale was Ui.dev at $25,000.

That’s it for August hope you found this useful.

All sales data courtesy of Namebio

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How low will .coms at Epik go? Namepros members will decide

Epik

One of the hottest threads on Namepros over the last three weeks is the Epik.com Promo Deals and Happy Hour Mega-Thread. In that thread Rob Monster has been publishing happy hour specials where .com domains have been available to register or transfer for $6.99.

Epik has made a concerted effort to be visible and available on Namepros. Several employees have joined Namepros and post promos while also responding to members questions.

It seems as this happy hour thread has moved on there was interest in seeing how low Epik will go on price.

Rob Monster has tied it to likes on this post

Epik Happy Hour

Of course domain investors are always looking for an even better deal and Rob was asked about $5.99 .coms?

So Rob added

$5.99 .Coms?

600 likes will now bring about $4.99 .com regs and $5.99 transfers.

Epik certainly seems like they are striving to be a domainer’s best friend when you look at all the participation on what is the social network of the domain industry, Namepros.

Rob shared some financial data with me regarding the company,

During Q2 our organic revenues grew 71% versus Q1 2019. In addition, we did consolidate two important technology acquisitions:  BitMitigate and Sibyl Systems.
We are now completing a $2.5 million investment round this quarter comprised of value-added investors.  This will find additional technology investment and perhaps another small acquisition.

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The second quarter of 2019 closed with 354.7 million domain name registrations across all top-level domains

Verisign

Verisign (VRSN NASDAQ) released their Domain Name Industry Brief for Q2 2019. The second quarter of 2019 closed with 354.7 million domain name registrations across all top-level domains (TLDs), an increase of 2.9 million domain name registrations, or 0.8 percent, compared to the first quarter of 2019.

 

.COM AND .NET DETAIL

The .com and .net TLDs had a combined total of 156.1 million domain name registrations in the domain name base3 at the end of the second quarter of 2019, an increase of 1.3 million domain name registrations, or 0.9 percent, compared to the first quarter of 2019. The .com and .net TLDs had a combined increase of 6.4 million domain name registrations, or 4.3 percent, year over year. As of June 30, 2019, the .com domain name base totaled 142.5 million domain name registrations, while the .net domain name base totaled 13.6 million domain name registrations.

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Founder of Squadhelp interviewed at Inc

Squadhelp

Darpan Munjal is the founder of Squadhelp, a company that helps people name their business. The naming platform has become very popular over the last year at Namepros with many members submitting names there. For the 2nd Time, Squadhelp.com has made the Inc. 500, Ranking No. 274

Mr. Munjal was interviewed for the upcoming issue of Inc. and provides some insight into how he started Squadhelp.

From the article:

I soon knew I needed a controlled platform on which competition and cash awards would incentivize people to submit high-quality names. I registered the domain Squadhelp.com and spent several months building the platform. Then, in late 2011, after I’d left Kaplan, I launched the website. One of the first contests on the site gave me the name for the e-commerce company I co-founded in 2012–Fashionara.com–and which operated until 2016.

How much does it cost?

Our naming competitions start at $199, and our logo design competitions start at $299. Also, there are three additional contest level that each offer more features and benefits. See our Pricing Page for details.

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Netico scores another $15,000 .tv sale

Dot Tv

NordVPN WW

Netico Inc sold Piano.tv for $15,000 last month on Sedo and they followed that up last night with another .tv sale, the sale of Caliente.tv (Spanish for Hot) again at $15,000. These represent a tie for the fourth highest sales in .tv for 2019.

Both names were registered back in 2010.

Only 153 .tv sales reported year to date for $250,000. Not the best numbers in 2018 there were 208 for $341,000. There is a chance those numbers can be matched but going to need a pick up in the last four months. The average sale price is almost identical at $1,637.

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Uniregistry weekly sales led by Skew.com

Uniregistry

Uniregistry released their top 20 sales for the week and Skew.com led the way at $92,000. Simple.Life was second at $20,000 and another 4L was third with Zord.com selling for $13,000.

1. skew $92,000
2. simple.life $20,000
3. zord.com $13,000
4. joi.co $12,000
5. lavax.com $10,000
6. jendela.com $10,000
7. beachweek.com $10,000
8. 8852.net $3,300
9. sketchbot.com $3,000

10. memberportal.com $7,500
11. poolcrew.com $5,500
12. expressoffers.com $5,000
13. houseoflove.com $5,000
14. wg1.com $4,500
15. railanalytics.com $4,250
16. offroadracer.com $4,000
17. datingatlanta.com $4,000
18. vancouverplumbing.com $4,000
19. organicaloe.com $4,000
20. bitorex.com $3,800

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